Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Landowner consideration of conservation easement utilization in the Adirondack Park of New York
by Nowak, Matthew J., M.S., State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 2012, 87; 1514400
Abstract (Summary)

A survey regarding the granting of conservation easements was administered to 472 Adirondack Park landowners (39.8% response rate). The theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991) and a conceptual model for easement adoption proposed by Kabii and Horwitz (2006) served as a framework for the study. Analyzed constructs included attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, nature conservation equity, nature conservation ethic, economic dependence on property, private property rights, confidence in permanent easement mechanisms, and demographic variables: gender, age, and years owned property. Significant positive relationships were identified between confidence in permanent easement mechanisms and attitude towards easements as well as subjective norms. Age was also positively related to attitude, and nature conservation ethic positively related to perceived behavioral control. Importance placed on private property rights was negatively related to attitude towards easements. Finally, attitude and subjective norms were positively related to intention to grant a conservation easement. Policy implications are included.

Key Words: conservation easement, Adirondack Park, Theory of Planned Behavior

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kuehn, Diane M.
Commitee: Bick, Steven, Dawson, Chad P.
School: State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Department: Forest Resources Management
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 51/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Behavioral psychology, Natural Resource Management, Land Use Planning
Keywords: Adirondack park, Conservation easement, Theory of planned behavior
Publication Number: 1514400
ISBN: 9781267457776
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest