Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Exposure to potentially traumatic events, emotional adjustment, and social competence in preschoolers facing economic risk
by Hurst, Hillary, M.A., University of Massachusetts Boston, 2012, 109; 1512046
Abstract (Summary)

The current study examined the relationship between exposure to potentially traumatic events (PTEs), emotional adjustment, and social competence in a sample of economically-disadvantaged, racially and ethnically diverse preschool-aged children (n=63; 60% female; average age = 52 months, S.D. = 10.30, range: 36-74 months). In this cross-sectional study, primary relationships between exposure to PTEs and emotional adjustment, and exposure to PTEs and social competence were examined. Additionally, parent affective symptoms were tested as a moderator of the relationship between child exposure to PTEs and emotional adjustment, and emotional adjustment was tested as a moderator of the relationship between child exposure to PTEs and social competence. Gender effects of these relationships also were tested, on an exploratory basis. The results of the current study suggest that exposure to PTEs involving interpersonal violence are predictive of parent-reported emotional adjustment, and also that teacher-reported emotional adjustment moderates the relationship between exposure to PTEs and teacher-reported social competence. This research contributes to existing literature, particularly on the relationship between emotional adjustment and social competence, which is rarely studied through the lens of economic disadvantage and exposure to PTEs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Eisenhower, Abbey
Commitee: Carter, Alice S., Liem, Joan H.
School: University of Massachusetts Boston
Department: Clinical Psychology (PhD)
School Location: United States -- Massachusetts
Source: MAI 50/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology
Keywords: Childhood trauma, Emotional adjustment, Potentially traumatic events, Social competence
Publication Number: 1512046
ISBN: 9781267388643
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest