Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Good cop, bad cop: Communication accommodation, perception, and trust in law enforcement-suspect encounters
by Kwon, Andy C., M.A., The University of Alabama, 2012, 96; 1511795
Abstract (Summary)

Since the 1980s, community policing has been embraced as the dominant police strategy. Thompson (1983) estimates that 97% of an officer’s time is spent communicatively interacting with the public, which indicates a strong incentive to study how communication affects those involved in police interaction. Utilizing Communication Accommodation Theory as a theoretical framework, this study examines the relationship between communication accommodation, perception, and trust and poses the following question: How does a police officer’s communication accommodation affect the communicative relationship between a police officer and his or her suspect? An online questionnaire was distributed to 257 students at a large, southeastern University, and their responses were analyzed. The data indicates that accommodative behavior can lead suspects to be more trusting of the police, but did not have a significant effect on police perception. Overall, this study helps fill a significant research gap in the police communication literature and provides pragmatic implications to improve the police-suspect interaction.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Mills, Carol B.
Commitee: Baker, Jane S., Howell, Rebecca
School: The University of Alabama
Department: Communication Studies
School Location: United States -- Alabama
Source: MAI 50/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Communication, Criminology, Mass communications
Keywords: Communication accommodation theory, Law enforcement, Perception, Police, Suspect, Trust
Publication Number: 1511795
ISBN: 978-1-267-38258-0
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