Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The reconciliation of personal-corporate identity conflicts by evangelical Christian workers
by Anderson, Michael, M.A., Gonzaga University, 2012, 71; 1511504
Abstract (Summary)

Communication can be viewed as a negotiation of identity. In that negotiation it is inevitable that conflicts in identity will occur (Lederach, as cited in Stewart, 2006). When that conflict is between one's personal identity and the corporate identity an organization asks, or even requires of that person, what processes are used to reconcile those differences? This question becomes even more salient in an organization utilizing a cultural style of organizational structure (Conrad & Poole, 2005). Cultural organizational structures are rooted in a belief that people, as emotional beings, need to feel connected to their work community. Understanding identity reconciliation techniques (Hecht & Jung, 2004, Tracy & Trethewey, 2003) and challenges such as these can help leaders in cultural organizations to lead more effectively and treat their employees in a manner consistent with cultural organizational ideology. Employees and members of organizations may be more productive and find greater satisfaction when personal and work identities are closely aligned. Based on previous research on identity formation, cultural organizations, and ethics (Christians, 2008), this ethnographic study of an evangelical vocational ministry seeks to bring clarity to the processes and ethical implications of identity in a "strong” cultural organization.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Crandall, Heather, Hoover, Kristine
Commitee: Caputo, John, Dare, Alexa, Inagaki, Nobuya
School: Gonzaga University
Department: Communication and Leadership
School Location: United States -- Washington
Source: MAI 50/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Religion, Ethics, Management, Communication, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Ethics, Faith-based organization, Identity, Leadership, Reconcile, Strong culture
Publication Number: 1511504
ISBN: 9781267367723
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