Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Kids and digs: Promoting archaeology education on the Coconino National Forest
by Long, Emily M., M.A., Northern Arizona University, 2012, 132; 1511512
Abstract (Summary)

The primary goals of this thesis are to examine the importance of public archaeology education and to present possible opportunities for Federal agencies to teach archaeology through unique media on the Internet and through mock excavation scenarios. During the Summer of 2011, I served as an archaeologicall technician for the Flagstaff Ranger District on the Coconino National Forest. My internship with the U.S. Forest Service took place under the guidance of Jeremy Haines, the Flagstaff Ranger District Archaeologist. My primary duties included surveying the Turkey Butte Fuels Reduction Project area, conduct a post-tornado inventory survey, provide support for the 2011 wildfire season, and prepare a compliance report and simulated excavation for Elden Pueblo.

Through the Turkey Butte Survey, the post-tornado inventory, and other minor survey projects, I gained a better understanding of the prehistoric and historic archaeology of the Coconino National Forest. Preparing compliance reports for various projects and writing my own compliance report allowed me to engage with the 'administrative red tape' that must occur before conducting any major undertaking on public lands. I also experienced the importance of engaging in good-faith tribal consultation in order to meet the needs of both the agency and tribal concerns.

Providing teaching support during the Elden Pueblo Archaeological Project school programs helped me learn how to best engage the public, particularly children, with different types of media. I already knew how to excavate an archaeological feature, but my internship pushed me to create a reverse excavation in a way that would tell a story about the Northern Sinagua at Elden Pueblo and be as archaeologically accurate as possible. For my thesis project, I constructed a large-scale excavation scenario and developed teaching materials for Elden Pueblo, a prehistoric Sinagua pueblo complex on the Coconino National Forest. This thesis provides insight into the possibilities of public archaeology education at the Federal level.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Smiley, Francis E.
Commitee: Downum, Christian E., Smiley, Francis E., Vannette, Walter M.
School: Northern Arizona University
Department: Anthropology
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: MAI 50/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Archaeology, Social studies education
Keywords: Archaeology education, Arizona, Coconino National Forest, Elden Pueblo, Public archaeology, Sinagua, USDA Forest Service
Publication Number: 1511512
ISBN: 9781267367846
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest