Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Medication as a Predictor of Comorbid Awareness in HIV-positive Individuals
by Nocon, Allina A., M.P.H., Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 2012, 25; 1509914
Abstract (Summary)

Purpose. The purpose of this study is to determine if being prescribed medication for an index condition can be used as a predictor of comorbid awareness in HIV-positive individuals.

Background. Advances in antiretroviral therapy have increased survival and life expectancy of HIV-positive individuals but mortality remains high. There is a growing population of older HIV-infected patients who are developing non-HIV related comorbidities. These comorbidities have been associated with decreased quality of life and increased risk of mortality.

Methods. Patient responses were sorted to determine frequencies of awareness for the category: "Has it and did not know they had the condition." Descriptive analyses were performed. A cross tabulation was done to produce the group that responded with the following: "I take medication for it," "I do not take medication for it." Frequency analyses were then done for the following response: "I don't have the condition," and "I am not sure I have the condition," but are documented to have the index condition and be on medication. Predictors of awareness were assessed using statistical tests such as the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), T-tests, and Pearson correlations.

Results. Out of the 15 conditions assessed: high blood pressure (58.3%), arthritis (30.8%), cardiovascular disease (28.6%), stroke (16.7%), and high cholesterol (12.9%) had the highest percentage of patients who were on medication but were not aware they had the condition. There were very few patients who were on medication and were not aware they had comorbid conditions, however, a positive association between oral treatment and the index condition being treated could not be established. Black non-Hispanics were found to have the highest sensitivity score (42%) as well as the group to have the most chart documented comorbidities (43%).

Conclusion. Further studies are needed to identify risk factors for patient awareness in the HIV-infected population; specifically education level, literacy, and health literacy.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Garland, Elizabeth, Weiss, Jeffrey J.
Commitee:
School: Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Department: Public Health
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 50/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Public health
Keywords: Comorbid, HIV, Patient awareness
Publication Number: 1509914
ISBN: 9781267320117
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