Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Occupancy rates, types of ownership, and chain affiliations as predictors for quality scores of nursing homes with Medicare's five-star quality rating system
by Oldag, Lisa E., M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2011, 47; 1511376
Abstract (Summary)

This study examined the association of the quality of California nursing homes (based on Medicare's 2009 Five-Star Quality rating system) with occupancy rates, types of ownership, and chain affiliations of these nursing homes. Regression analyses were applied to analyze the predictive relationship between nursing home occupancy rates and their quality scores, and independent sample t-tests were conducted to study the mean differences in quality scores between types of ownership and between chain affiliations. Occupancy rates did not significantly predict overall quality ratings; however, when broken down into three specific quality categories, occupancy rates significantly predicted higher scores earned in health inspections, staffing, and quality measures. Type of ownership was a significant predictor of overall quality: nonprofit nursing homes earned higher overall quality ratings than for profit nursing homes. Chain affiliation was not a significant predictor of overall quality. The implication is that, because nursing homes are required to report their quality ratings to the public, they must seriously consider the quality of care they provide to their clients by making an effort to raise or maintain high quality ratings in order to attract new clients or retain high occupancy rates.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Sinay, Tony
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 50/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Gerontology, Public health, Health care management
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1511376
ISBN: 978-1-267-30890-0
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