Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Synthesis and characterization of porous metal organic framework materials
by Irfanoglu, Burcin, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2012, 62; 1511354
Abstract (Summary)

Porous materials have been known since the 18th century in natural forms of inorganic structures known as zeolites and organic structures known as carbon. Applications of porous materials in a large range of industries have been widespread. During the last two decades, a novel porous material type has been designed which combines organic and inorganic features. Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are highly porous crystals in which a metal ion or cluster combines with an unlimited variety of organic ligands. In this work, several metal organic frameworks have been synthesized and their promising applications as gas storage materials and potential as photocatalysts are discussed.

First, we show a novel synthetic strategy to design three-ring based metal organic frameworks. Lowering ring sizes permits potentially larger pore volumes, but it is harder to synthesize because of possible ring strains. In this work, we selected the metal center as In+3 ion and used mixed dicarboxylic linkers with 120 and 180 degree angles between functional groups to synthesize a series of isostructural three-ring-based zeolite-type MOFs.

In the second part of our studies, we achieved synthesis of new two-dimensional and three-dimensional frameworks with the usage of 4-sulfanylbenzoic acid (SBA) ligand as a linker. Up to date, the use of SBA as a linker has not been studied. Our studies showed the potential of SBA and related ligands as useful building blocks in the construction of MOFs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Bu, Xianhui
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 50/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Inorganic chemistry
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1511354
ISBN: 9781267308689
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