Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Nerdy women to jest and to swear: An ethnographic study of group hierarchy and humor
by DeLea, Daniella Rachel, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2012, 197; 1511346
Abstract (Summary)

Previous research shows how members within communities display their identity and hierarchical position through language. In the last two decades scholars have focused on high school women and grade school girls as research subjects, but have not yet studied if the deconstruction of stereotypes through what has been deemed "nerdy practices" by researchers exists in adults. This research study examines the connection between joking, footing, stance, hierarchy, and literacy practices among a group of all female "nerds." It focuses on a small community of women linked by their shared practice of attending college together, frequent daily interactions, and multi modal written communication. A community of practice approach is used, alongside an ethnographic methodology to see how group hierarchy and identity are reflected in the language practices of humor and swearing.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Jaffe, Alexandra
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 50/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Linguistics, Cultural anthropology, Sociolinguistics
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1511346
ISBN: 978-1-267-30860-3
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