Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An analysis of the capabilities of electronic medical records in physician office practices
by Neu, Mark, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2012, 47; 1511371
Abstract (Summary)

The Electronic Medical Record represents a significant transformation in not only how a patient's medical information is maintained but also in how it is used. The literature shows that moving from physical documentation and stand-alone patient information systems to fully integrated and highly interoperable patient information systems drives greater efficiency, increases clinical safety and improves mandatory public health reporting. However, the predictive nature of the relationship between having an Electronic Medical Record and how physician practices are using the particular individual computerized capabilities within the Electronic Medical Record has yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to identify this relationship among office-based physician practices; the implication is that a more robust and capable Electronic Medical Record can be identified to improve the use of patient care computerized capabilities. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: Electronic Medical Records Supplement (2008) was analyzed to gain insight into the predictive relationship between Electronic Medical Record utilization and other specific computerized capabilities in physician office practices in the United States. The three hypotheses were that utilization of an Electronic Medical Record is a predictive factor for efficiency-related computerized capabilities, for safety related computerized capabilities and for computerized capability for mandatory public health reporting in this population. The hypotheses were partially supported. Practical implications and future directions were discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Sinay, Tony
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 50/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Health care management
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1511371
ISBN: 9781267308856
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest