Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The relationship between self-efficacy and breastfeeding duration
by Aquilina, Suzanne, D.N.P., Carlow University, 2011, 101; 3506844
Abstract (Summary)

A correlational study of demographic data and self-efficacy with breastfeeding duration as well as exclusivity was conducted on 77 postpartum women in a suburban Western New York hospital over a 6-month period. This convenience sample of predominately white, middle class, and highly educated women completed a demographic tool and the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale – Short Form in the hospital followed by telephone follow up at 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months to measure breastfeeding duration. Pearson correlation for continuous variables (e.g., age with breastfeeding duration) and one way ANOVA or independent samples t test for categorical variables (e.g., highest education, ethnic background) found negative relationships between prenatal classes and formula supplementation on breastfeeding duration (P = .020, P=.029, respectively). Women returning to work had lower self-efficacy (P = .003), and intention and self-efficacy were positively correlated (P = .021). Cesarean section delivery and employment showed a trend toward significantly decreasing breastfeeding duration (P = .052; P = .089, respectfully). A gap exists between knowledge and practice; health professionals need enhanced lactation education throughout their training. Recommendations for the future include evaluation of longer pre- and post-natal education programs, legislation to increase parental leave and baby friendly policies both in the workplace and hospital enhancing a woman’s self-efficacy to overcome perceived barriers to breastfeeding. The aim of these interventions is to contribute to the paradigm shift of breastfeeding as the cultural norm and meet the goals of Healthy People 2020.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Slota, Peggy
Commitee:
School: Carlow University
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-B 73/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Nursing, Nutrition
Keywords: Breastfeeding, Confidence, Self-efficacy
Publication Number: 3506844
ISBN: 9781267302359
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