Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An interview-based inquiry into challenges faced by licensed mental health professionals who utilize shamanic healing practices
by Foor, Daniel, Ph.D., Saybrook University, 2009, 159; 3368988
Abstract (Summary)

Increasing numbers of licensed mental health professionals in the United States utilize diverse indigenous and nonindigenous shamanic healing methods in their clinical practices; however, use of these methods in a psychotherapeutic setting can give rise to a variety of ethical and professional challenges. This research study sought to understand both the nature of these challenges and the ways that shamanic-oriented clinicians are currently addressing them in clinical practice. In-depth interviews were conducted with six licensed psychotherapists of diverse backgrounds throughout the United States, all of whom openly use shamanic healing methods in their clinical practices. Results detail diverse types of ethical and professional dilemmas pertaining to areas such as cultural appropriateness of shamanic work, informed consent, scope of practice, contraindications for shamanic healing work, and multiple-relationship tensions particular to shamanic-oriented clinicians. Conclusions underscored the diversity among contemporary practitioners of shamanism in the United States, the need for greater collegial dialogue, and the current lack of a professional organization to represent shamanic-oriented mental health professionals.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kremer, Jurgen
Commitee: Krippner, Stanley, Richards, Ruth
School: Saybrook University
Department: Humanistic & Transpersonal Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 70/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mental health, Psychology, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Ceremony, Mental health, Psychotherapy, Shamanic healing, Shamanic-oriented psychotherapy, Shamanism
Publication Number: 3368988
ISBN: 9781109305449